New Collections


Announcing “Suggested Searches”: A New Feature in Twentieth-Century Global Perspectives

Cold War for Suggested Searches.JPGEarlier this year Readex launched a new suite of online resources on the crucial issues that shaped the post-World War II world. The suite is titled Twentieth-Century Global Perspectives and includes collections covering apartheid, the Cold War, migrations and refugees, race relations in the United States, and more. The content—from the archives of the C.I.A. and available nowhere else in fully searchable form—includes translated radio broadcasts, foreign-government reports, journal articles, television transcripts, and news items of various kinds.

Each of these primary source collections provides students and scholars with perspectives from outside of the United States. Such views are crucial to the proper understanding of world issues and shed enormous light on how nations across the globe responded to emerging matters of geo-political importance.

Over the past six months Readex has received requests from users to provide “pathways” into the content that enable deep research on key themes and topics.

Announcing “Suggested Searches”: A New Feature in Twentieth-Century Global Perspectives

Readex to Deepen Its Acclaimed Digital Edition of African American Newspapers

Today, Readex distributed this news release:

Readex to Deepen Its Acclaimed Digital Edition of African American Newspapers

African American Newspapers, Series 2, will dramatically expand Series 1 with newly available titles

September 30, 2015 (NAPLES, FL) — The world’s most comprehensive collection of African American newspapers will be dramatically expanded by Readex in January 2016. African American Newspapers, Series 2, 1835-1956, will offer more than 60 newly available newspapers written for or by African Americans, enabling students and scholars to make new discoveries regarding the lives of African Americans as individuals, an ethnic group and Americans. Spanning more than a century of the African American experience, these rare titles form the single essential complement to African American Newspapers, 1827-1998.

“The expansion of African American Newspapers comes at a time when scholars are rediscovering the richness of this rare primary source material,” says Britt Rusert, Assistant Professor, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. “The historical span of the collection, its broad geographic scope, and the inclusion of non-English language papers will prove immensely helpful for scholarship and teaching in African American history, culture, literature, and related fields.”

Readex to Deepen Its Acclaimed Digital Edition of African American Newspapers

Readex Significantly Expands Early American Newspapers with Series 12, 1821-1900

Today, Readex distributed this news release:

 Readex Significantly Expands Early American Newspapers with Series 12, 1821-1900 

Hundreds of rare short-lived U.S. papers, available online for the first time 

September 22, 2015 (NAPLES, FL) — Featuring more than 1,200 19th-century titles collected by the American Antiquarian Society, Early American Newspapers, Series 12, 1821-1900, will be launched in January 2016 by Readex, a division of NewsBank. This searchable chronicle of 19th-century America is by far the largest selection of early U.S. newspapers offered to date, dramatically extending the political, geographical and subject-matter breadth and depth of the Early American Newspapers series.

Designed to meet multidisciplinary research and teaching needs, Series 12 contains journalistic accounts and commentary rich in topics essential to the humanities and social sciences. It also offers an especially rich trove of titles in specific disciplines. For the study of economic and industrial history a large number of agricultural and mercantile titles are included. Campaign newspapers are represented by titles covering all presidential and many important regional campaigns from the Early National Era to Reconstruction. Denominational newspapers provide new insight into religion—the epicenter of nearly everything in the 19th century—and offer unique commentary on such divisive issues as slavery, women’s suffrage and prohibition. In addition, gazettes—known as newspapers of record—are replete with prized statistical data.

Readex Significantly Expands Early American Newspapers with Series 12, 1821-1900

New Historical Newspaper Collections to Meet Targeted Teaching and Research Needs

Today, Readex distributed this news release:

Readex Announces Five Unique New Historical Newspaper Collections to Meet Targeted Teaching and Research Needs

One-of-a-kind resources focus on American agriculture, business, political campaigns, religion, and official pronouncements and documents

September 17, 2015 (NAPLES, FL) — In partnership with the American Antiquarian Society and other partners, Readex will launch five new collections in November 2015. Each has been carefully designed to meet targeted teaching and research needs in diverse yet vital areas of American history.

American Business: Agricultural Newspapers offers an exclusive focus on agriculture, agricultural technology and the economics of farming. Agriculture was the dominant American business in the 18th and 19th centuries, fueling the social and economic engine that built the U.S. This unique collection provides 200 newspapers essential for understanding America’s agrarian heritage, national character and cultural values.

American Business: Mercantile Newspapers provides statistics-laden content through nearly 500 papers spawned by the rapid growth of shipping and international trade. Targeting wealthy merchants, professionals, and the educated elite, mercantile papers often were voluminous with a very large format, making production and subscription expensive. This matchless collection contains a goldmine of not only essential business data but also independent general news coverage and objective reporting.

New Historical Newspaper Collections to Meet Targeted Teaching and Research Needs

Six Highlights from the First Release of Early American Imprints, Supplements from the American Antiquarian Society, 1652-1819

The initial release of a major new enrichment to the Evans and Shaw-Shoemaker collections has just occurred. Rare items from the American Antiquarian Society, available for the first time in Readex digital editions of Early American Imprints, are highlighted below.


The Gosport Tragedy (1776)

From Early American Imprints, Supplements from the American Antiquarian Society

The Gosport Tragedy, or The Perjured Ship Carpenter, is a murder ballad set to the tune of Peggy's Gone Over Sea. The folk song tells of a young woman lured by her lover into the forest where she is killed and buried in a shallow grave. In this version of the story the woman, Molly, is murdered by a ship’s carpenter, William, who had promised to marry her after she became pregnant. When William returns to sea, he is haunted by Molly’s ghost and confesses to the murder before going mad.

Six Highlights from the First Release of Early American Imprints, Supplements from the American Antiquarian Society, 1652-1819

Tinkering Sailor, Soldier, Spy: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection

The February release of The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society includes an array of documents relatable to wars from nearly any era: the battlefield readiness of new military technology; prisoner mistreatment and battlefield atrocities; and the deadly threat of espionage from within.

Engineer Stimer's Report of the Last Trial Trip of the "Passaic": Unparalleled Attempt to Throw Discredit upon Superiors, Language Unbecoming an Officer, His Dismissal from the Service Demanded, the Public Probably Deceived as to the "Result" of the Experiment of Firing inside the Turret (1862)
By One of the People

Alban Crocker Stimers was a U.S. Navy Chief Engineer who assisted with the design of the Navy’s latest technological marvel, the ironclads. After the launch of the U.S.S. Monitor, the first ironclad warship commissioned by the Union Navy, and drawing on lessons learned from its performance, naval engineers quickly began designing the new Passaic-class ironclad.

A controversy arose during the production of the new class of warships when the Assistant Secretary of the Navy Gustavus Fox required the vessels be outfitted with a larger gun. This became problematic because the muzzle diameter of the new gun was too large for the turret opening and required the addition of a smoke box to capture the propellant gases released inside the turret. Unfortunately, the smoke box obstructed the view of the gunners, and they were no longer able to independently aim their weapon. However, according to Navy engineer Stimers, a supporter of firing from inside the turret, the experiment was a spectacular success. According to his report, the first shot…

Tinkering Sailor, Soldier, Spy: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection

“Beware of Imposters and Sharpers” and Other Advice for Civil War Soldiers and Surgeons

The January release of The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society contains works providing advice to discharged soldiers returning home, guidance on potential pension benefits, and instructions to surgeons on the changing use of anesthetics. Also included is a brilliantly illustrated biography of Robert E. Lee.

The Soldiers' Guide in Philadelphia (1861)
Published for gratuitous distribution by Robert R. Corson

This nifty city guide for soldiers includes railroad timetables as well as other pertinent information. Its “Instructions for Discharged Soldiers” provides rates of travel pay in addition to pension amounts for certain veterans and rates of survivors’ benefits for the heirs of deceased soldiers. It also gives special instructions to disabled veterans, directing them to the Citizens’ Volunteer Hospital where they will receive:

…every attention that kindness and medical aid can suggest, for the alleviation of their sufferings. Those soldiers who can bear transportation to other hospitals are carefully taken thither in the ambulances provided by the various Fire Companies of the city.

Advice is also tendered to those traveling beyond Philadelphia:

Soldiers arriving at Baltimore Depot and wishing to go directly to New York, will find horse cars in waiting, to take the direct to the Depot. BEWARE OF IMPOSTERS!

Discharged soldiers are also reminded:

“Beware of Imposters and Sharpers” and Other Advice for Civil War Soldiers and Surgeons

Cutting the “Cord of Caste”—The Impact of British Activist George Thompson on American Abolitionist Societies

Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison and George ThompsonGeorge Donisthorpe Thompson (1804-1878) was a British abolitionist who often pointed out America’s role in the perpetuation of slavery. Lecturing in the United States in 1834, Thompson attracted the attention of both abolitionists and slavery supporters. He left the U.S. “to escape the assassin’s knife,” a claim supported by the Hobart Town Courier, which reported that attempts to “burn and murder” Thompson had been made in several American towns. New abolitionist societies formed in the wake of Thompson’s speaking tour, and the November release of The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society contains the annual reports from three such societies, each of which was organized by women.

First Annual Report of the Ladies’ New-York City Anti-Slavery Society (1836)

In their first annual report, the Ladies’ New-York City Anti-Slavery Society referred to both Thompson’s role in their society’s organization and his unceremonious departure from the United States:

Cutting the “Cord of Caste”—The Impact of British Activist George Thompson on American Abolitionist Societies

“The Long, Wicked War”—Regimental Histories from the American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

Many of the documents in the October release of The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society are histories of specific regiments. Some contain registers naming each member of the regiment. Others include photographs of their officers. But they all have unique perspectives and descriptions of their regiment’s particular “tramps and triumphs.”  

Testimonial to Col. Rush C. Hawkins, Ninth Regiment N.Y.V. (1863)

At a ceremony honoring Col. Rush Christopher Hawkins and the Ninth Regiment of New York Volunteers, also known as “Hawkins’ Zouaves,” Charles P. Kirkland contextualized the gravity of the Civil War. He considered it not only “a contest for a nation’s life” but also a “contest for the very existence of Republican Government, not only here but every where, for if our experiment fails, it surely can NEVER be repeated,—it is a contest… to determine the question of man’s capacity for self-government.” Kirkland continued:

“The Long, Wicked War”—Regimental Histories from the American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

Civil War Turning Points: Highlights from the American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

The October release of the American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society includes documents discussing turning points in the war itself, the reputations of several prominent participants, and the ferocioius trench warfare that would later come to define the Western Front in World War I.

Within Fort Sumter; or, A View of Major Anderson's Garrison Family for One Hundred and Ten Days by One of the Company (1861)
By Miss A. Fletcher

In this volume, Miss A. Fletcher vividly describes life within Fort Sumter until its siege and eventual evacuation. She includes detailed accounts of the supply of rations, hastily constructed barracks within the fort, and the dramatic communications prior to the outbreak of war between U.S. Army office Major Robert Anderson and the Governor of South Carolina. On January 9, 1861, after the Union supply ship, Star of the West, was fired upon and forced to retreat from Charleston Harbor, Anderson wrote the following to Governor Francis Pickens:

Civil War Turning Points: Highlights from the American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

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