Collection Development


Readex Civil War database reviewed in current Library Journal

In the April 15 issue of Library Journal, Gail Golderman and Bruce Connolly review nine collections of primary-source materials related to the American Civil War.  Among these resources is The Civil War: Antebellum Period to Reconstruction—a thematic Readex collection created from multiple Archive of Americana collections.  Here’s a brief excerpt from their newest e-reviews column:

"Reduced to its bare essentials, The Civil War: Antebellum Period to Reconstruction—with 150 newspapers from across the country, roughly 50,000 documents culled from the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, and 4,000 rare broadsides and ephemeral itemsis a singularly impressive primary-source collection....there is a lot more here than the numbers alone convey.  

"The broad geographic sweep of these newspaper titles puts the regional perspectives and regional biases necessary to comprehend the meaning of this period of American history at the researcher's disposal....

"The huge U.S. Congressional Serial Set is one of the underappreciated gems among all the publications of the federal government....

Readex Civil War database reviewed in current Library Journal

Attend a Free February Webinar on African American Studies

Readex product director Brett Kolcun will present a live webinar on Feb. 28 for librarians, faculty and students who have an interest in African American studies. This in-depth webinar will explore the content, features and functionality of three acclaimed Archive of Americana collections:

  

 

African American Newspapers, 1827-1998

Attend a Free February Webinar on African American Studies

New Webinars: Historical Perspectives on the American South, West and Northeast

Newspaper Archives for Academic Research and Training: A Series of Three Regionally Focused Webinars

American newspapers—with their eyewitness reporting, editorials, advertisements, obituaries and human interest stories—have preserved essential records and detailed accounts of nearly every facet of regional and national life. Now searchable online, these regionally diverse newspaper archives span centuries of social, cultural, political, military, business, sports and literary history, providing students and scholars with invaluable original reporting and fresh, local-level insights.

Newspaper Archives of the American Northeast

Thursday, October 18 -- 1 to 2 pm EST

Newspaper publishing in New England and the Mid-Atlantic stateshas had a long and proud history, going back to the colonial era. In this webinar we’ll explore the rich histories of prominent newspapers such as the Boston Herald, New York Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, Springfield Republican, Trenton Evening Times, Washington Evening Star and others.

New Webinars: Historical Perspectives on the American South, West and Northeast

Afro-Americana Imprints—Now available for institutional trial

The digital edition of one of the world's preeminent collections for African American studies is now available for institutional trial. Created from the Library Company of Philadephia’s acclaimed Afro-Americana Collection—an accumulation that began with Benjamin Franklin and steadily increased throughout its entire history—this unique online resource will provide researchers with more than 12,000 printed works. These books, pamphlets, and broadsides, including many lesser-known imprints, hold a matchless record of African American history, literature, and culture.

This long-awaited collection spans nearly 400 years, from the early 16th to the early 20th centuries. Critically important subjects covered include the discovery and exploitation of Africa by the West; the rise of slavery in the New World along with the growth and success of abolitionist movements; the development of racial thought and racism; descriptions of African American life throughout the Americas; slavery and race in fiction and drama; and many others.

Afro-Americana Imprints—Now available for institutional trial

New Applications for Special Collections in the Digital Age (A 2012 ALA Video Presentation by Howard Dodson)

At the 2012 American Library Association annual meeting, Readex hosted a breakfast session with Howard Dodson, Jr., newly named Director of Moorland-Spingarn and Howard University Libraries and former chief of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

The full title of Dodson’s presentation was "New Applications for Special Collections in the Digital Age: Reshaping an Institution’s Teaching, Learning, and Research Mission."

In his talk, Dodson explained why the digital revolution is forcing academic libraries to change their collection strategies and rethink the role of special collections in their institutional identities.

http://youtu.be/2eYXafG1SpE

More about Howard Dodson, Jr.

New Applications for Special Collections in the Digital Age (A 2012 ALA Video Presentation by Howard Dodson)

Hitler’s Secret Mistress

Eva Braun (1912-1945)

In his recent review of Heike Görtemaker’s new book Eva Braun: Life with Hitler (New York Review of Books, Vol. 59, No. 7, Apr. 26, 2012), British historian Antony Beevor writes:

Although the American press had strong inklings of Hitler’s relationship with Eva Braun as early as May 1939, in Germany only Hitler’s intimate circle knew of her existence. (p. 26)

Springfield Daily Republican (Dec. 31, 1937). Source: American Newspaper Archives.

As early as Dec. 31, 1937, however, an article in the Springfield Daily Republican of Springfield, Massachusetts, under the title “Hitler Is In Love, His Foes Whisper” with a dateline of Berlin, Dec. 30, begins:

A new anti-Nazi underground organization today circulated through Berlin pamphlets saying Chancellor Hitler has formed a romantic attachment to an obscure German girl. The girl’s name was given as Eva Braun and she was described as an assistant to Hitler’s official photographer, Herr Hoffman. (p. 7)

Hitler’s Secret Mistress

Special Collections in the Digital Age: An American Library Association Breakfast Event

On Sunday morning, June 24, at the American Library Association annual meeting in Anaheim, Howard Dodson, Jr., newly named Director of Moorland-Spingarn and Howard University Libraries, will present:

New Applications for Special Collections in the Digital Age: Reshaping an Institution’s Teaching, Learning and Research Mission

Prior to the digital revolution, special collections were at best novelties in academic libraries—marginal resources with limited staffs, budgets, and roles in university curricula and university research enterprises.  The majority of staff, budgets, and space were invested in “primary collections”: the academic library’s books and serials.  Today, the digital revolution is forcing academic libraries to change their collection strategies and rethink the role of special collections in their institutional identities.

Howard Dodson, Jr., Director of Moorland-Spingarn and Howard University Libraries

Special Collections in the Digital Age: An American Library Association Breakfast Event

Enhancements, Training and Content (ETC): 2012 Update 1

ETC (Enhancements, Training and Content) is an ongoing, multifaceted program that provides Readex customers with one-of-a-kind historical content unavailable online elsewhere. In addition, the ETC program ensures the latest and most useful features and functionality, and regularly scheduled training provides guidance and suggestions for making the most of your Readex collections. ETC also covers online access and storage support.

January through March 2012 ETC Content Releases

U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817-1994: House and Senate Journals from the 93rd Congress (4,796 pages);

Early American Newspapers: up to 108 additional issues in seven series;

Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports, 1974-1996: Central Eurasia Report (2,207 pages).

Enhancements, Training and Content (ETC): 2012 Update 1

Announcing the digital edition of Washington, D.C.’s Evening Star, 1852-1922

Old Evening Star Building on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. -- Source: Carol M. Highsmith Archive (Library of Congress)

This spring Readex will begin releasing a complete 70-year span of The Evening Star—one of the most influential newspapers in U.S. history. For more than a century, historians have regarded The Evening Star as the newspaper of record for the nation’s capital. Today, curators from leading newspaper repositories cite this long-running afternoon daily as one of their most heavily researched papers.

Man buying The Evening Star from newsboy -- Source: National Photo Company Collection (Library of Congress)

Announcing the digital edition of Washington, D.C.’s Evening Star, 1852-1922

Readex announces Early American Newspapers, Series 8 and Series 9, 1832-1922

From Early American Newspapers, Series 9

This spring Readex will begin releasing two new series in its acclaimed Early American Newspapers collection. Early American Newspapers, Series 8 and Series 9 both feature full runs through 1922 of important, long-running titles from diverse regions of the United States. Each is notable for its depth of 19th- and early 20th-century news coverage, as exemplified by the large number of pages in every issue. Together, the titles in these two new series further expand the political, geographical and chronological depth of Early American Newspapers.  

From Early American Newspapers, Series 8

Readex announces Early American Newspapers, Series 8 and Series 9, 1832-1922

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